An analysis of how the idea of a god is a very skeptical idea by hume and descartes

The mind has never anything present to it but the perceptions and cannot possibly reach any experience of their connection with objects. So, for the purpose of rejecting all my opinions, it will be enough if I find in each of them at least some reason for doubt. Hume, like Locke and Berkeleyalso sought to do away with the longstanding philosophical belief that abstractions are real.

Descartes recognized that as human beings, our thoughts cause our bodies to do things, and likewise our bodies can cause thoughts to occur in our minds. But the first two paragraphs of that Meditation imply a quite different argumentative strategy.

He wants knowledge that is utterly indefeasible. But such pre-reflective judgments may be ill-grounded, even when true.

Descartes and Hume both distinguished beliefs produced by reason from beliefs produced by the imagination i.

But in order even to begin this project you must first clear away the accumulated rubbish. Our intellect--and not our eyes--judges that there are people, and not automata, under those coats and hats. And, for Descartes, this should soothe any doubts about it.

So, for the purpose of rejecting all my opinions, it will be enough if I find in each of them at least some reason for doubt. The Meditator then moves on to ask how he comes to know of this "I.

Everything that the Meditator has accepted as most true he has come to learn from or through his senses. Two such objections are suggested in a passage from the pragmatist Peirce: In the Meditations, he gives two arguments for the existence of God.

You want to know what the world is like. Hume differs from these philosophers, however, in that he remains skeptical about what causes our perceptions of things. For Descartes, the world was to be understood in purely mechanical terms, as Newton would later describe.

On one plausible line of reply, Descartes does not yet intend to be establishing the metaphysical result; rather, the initial intended result is merely epistemic.

This infallibilist demand has often been associated with a foundationalist conception of human knowledge which portrays properly justified belief as the product of an inference from a class of propositions of which we are certain e.

Since induction could not be so vindicated, Hume made the required admission: And so other arguments can now occur to me which might easily undermine my opinion, if I were unaware of [the true] God; and I should thus never have true and certain knowledge about anything, but only shifting and changeable opinions.

How big a bulldozer is she to use. Rather the ideas of perception and imagination are mental images: Furthermore Descartes, at least, suggests a way in which this demand might be motivated.

That is their job. And if God can deceive us of our clear and distinct perceptions, perhaps even the cogito can be cast back into doubt. In order to appreciate the point of this effort, it helps to try to imagine how you might proceed if you suddenly came to doubt the reliability of the numerous authorities you have trusted as sources of information about the natural world.

Making doubt universal and hyperbolic helps to distinguish genuine unshakability from the mere appearance of it. Having introduced the Evil Genius Doubt, the First Meditation program of demolition is not only hyperbolic but universal.

On both accounts, ideas mediate our perception of external objects. All substances also have affections, things that hold of the substances. The reason why we mistakenly infer that there is something in the cause that necessarily produces its effect is because our past experiences have habituated us to think in this way.

Upon reflection, it is hard to think of any substantive belief about the world we inhabit that has not been acquired "through the senses".

Having noted in the passage quoted above that inconclusive evidence leaves the rational believer indifferent as to what he ought to believe, Descartes completes the passage by linking this fact with the psychological efficacy of the sceptical doubt: In the same way, I began by taking everything that was doubtful and throwing it out, like sand … Replies 7, AT 7: This line of interpretation does, of course, imply that the cogito does not initially count as full-fledged Knowledge — an issue to which we now turn.

Let us consider some of the common objections. Hume applies this method of analysis to the idea of "causal connection" which is of course an essential idea in the universal principle of causality on which many of his predecessors had relied.

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René Descartes

René Descartes (/ d eɪ ˈ k ɑːr t /, UK used in the discovery of infinitesimal calculus and analysis. Descartes was also one of the key figures in the Scientific Revolution. the idea that I have of God is the most true, the most clear and distinct." Descartes considered himself to be a devout Catholic.

The discussion of the theory of ideas is a preamble to Descartes' attempt to prove the existence of God. According to Descartes, ideas are the atoms of thought, and all thought is made up of composite ideas. Hume differs from these philosophers, however, in that he remains skeptical about what causes our perceptions of things.

While Locke assumes there is a material substance which causes our perceptions, and Berekeley presents the radical thesis that the cause of our perceptions originates in the Mind of God, Hume refuses to make either assumption.

An analysis of how the idea of a god is a very skeptical idea by hume and descartes
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Descartes' Theory of Ideas (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)